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EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20503
T HE DI REC T O R
December 8, 2008
M-10-06
MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES
FROM:
Peter R. Orszag
Director
SUBJECT:
Open Government Directive
In the Memorandum on Transparency and Open Government, issued on January 21,
2009, the President instructed the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to
issue an Open Government Directive. Responding to that instruction, this memorandum is
intended to direct executive departments and agencies to take specific actions to implement the
principles of transparency, participation, and collaboration set forth in the President’s
Memorandum. This Directive was informed by recommendations from the Federal Chief
Technology Officer, who solicited public comment through the White House Open Government
Initiative.
The three principles of transparency, participation, and collaboration form the
cornerstone of an open government. Transparency promotes accountability by providing the
public with information about what the Government is doing. Participation allows members of
the public to contribute ideas and expertise so that their government can make policies with the
benefit of information that is widely dispersed in society. Collaboration improves the
effectiveness of Government by encouraging partnerships and cooperation within the Federal
Government, across levels of government, and between the Government and private institutions.
This Open Government Directive establishes deadlines for action. But because of the
presumption of openness that the President has endorsed, agencies are encouraged to advance
their open government initiatives well ahead of those deadlines. In addition to the steps
delineated in this memorandum, Attorney General Eric Holder earlier this year issued new
guidelines
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1
for agencies with regard to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). With those
guidelines, the Attorney General reinforced the principle that openness is the Federal
Government’s default position for FOIA issues.
http://www.usdoj.gov/ag/foia-memo-march2009.pdf

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This memorandum requires executive departments and agencies to take the following
steps toward the goal of creating a more open government:
1. Publish Government Information Online
To increase accountability, promote informed participation by the public, and create
economic opportunity, each agency shall take prompt steps to expand access to
information by making it available online in open formats.
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a. Agencies shall respect the presumption of openness by publishing information
online (in addition to any other planned or mandated publication methods) and by
preserving and maintaining electronic information, consistent with the Federal
Records Act and other applicable law and policy. Timely publication of
information is an essential component of transparency. Delays should not be
viewed as an inevitable and insurmountable consequence of high demand.
With respect to information,
the presumption shall be in favor of openness (to the extent permitted by law and subject
to valid privacy, confidentiality, security, or other restrictions).
b. To the extent practicable and subject to valid restrictions, agencies should publish
information online in an open format that can be retrieved, downloaded, indexed,
and searched by commonly used web search applications. An open format is one
that is platform independent, machine readable, and made available to the public
without restrictions that would impede the re-use of that information.
c. To the extent practical and subject to valid restrictions, agencies should
proactively use modern technology to disseminate useful information, rather than
waiting for specific requests under FOIA.
d. Within 45 days, each agency shall identify and publish online in an open format at
least three high-value data sets (see attachment section 3.a.i) and register those
data sets via Data.gov. These must be data sets not previously available online or
in a downloadable format.
e. Within 60 days, each agency shall create an Open Government Webpage located
at http://www.[agency].gov/open to serve as the gateway for agency activities
related to the Open Government Directive and shall maintain and update that
webpage in a timely fashion.
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The Federal Government has defined information in OMB Circular A-130, “Management of Federal Information
Resources,” as any communication or representation of knowledge such as facts, data, or opinions presented in any
medium or format.

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f. Each Open Government Webpage shall incorporate a mechanism for the public
to:
i. Give feedback on and assessment of the quality of published information;
ii. Provide input about which information to prioritize for publication; and
iii. Provide input on the agency’s Open Government Plan (see 3.a.).
g. Each agency shall respond to public input received on its Open Government
Webpage on a regular basis.
h. Each agency shall publish its annual Freedom of Information Act Report in an
open format on its Open Government Webpage in addition to any other planned
dissemination methods.
i. Each agency with a significant pending backlog of outstanding Freedom of
Information requests shall take steps to reduce any such backlog by ten percent
each year.
j. Each agency shall comply with guidance on implementing specific Presidential
open government initiatives, such as Data.gov, eRulemaking, IT Dashboard,
Recovery.gov, and USAspending.gov.
2. Improve the Quality of Government Information
To improve the quality of government information available to the public, senior leaders
should make certain that the information conforms to OMB guidance on information
quality
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a. Within 45 days, each agency, in consultation with OMB, shall designate a high-
level senior official to be accountable for the quality and objectivity
and that adequate systems and processes are in place within the agencies to
promote such conformity.
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3
Information Quality Act, Pub. L. No. 106-554, section 515; see also, “Guidelines for Ensuring and Maximizing
the Quality, Objectivity, Utility, and Integrity of Information Disseminated by Federal Agencies” (67 FR 8452) and
your agency’s Information Quality Act guidelines.
4
The Federal Government has defined quality and objectivity in, “Guidelines for Ensuring and Maximizing the
Quality, Objectivity, Utility, and Integrity of Information Disseminated by Federal Agencies” (67 FR 8452).
Quality is “…the encompassing term, of which ‘utility,’ ‘objectivity,’ and ‘integrity’ are the constituents.”
“‘Objectivity’ focuses on whether the disseminated information is being presented in an accurate, clear, complete,
and unbiased manner, and as a matter of substance, is accurate, reliable, and unbiased.”
of, and
internal controls over, the Federal spending information publicly disseminated

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through such public venues as USAspending.gov or other similar websites. The
official shall participate in the agency’s Senior Management Council, or similar
governance structure, for the agency-wide internal control assessment pursuant to
the Federal Managers’ Financial Integrity Act.
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b. Within 60 days, the Deputy Director for Management at OMB will issue, through
separate guidance or as part of any planned comprehensive management
guidance, a framework for the quality of Federal spending information publicly
disseminated through such public venues as USAspending.gov or other similar
websites. The framework shall require agencies to submit plans with details of
the internal controls implemented over information quality, including system and
process changes, and the integration of these controls within the agency’s existing
infrastructure. An assessment will later be made as to whether additional guidance
on implementing OMB guidance on information quality is necessary to cover
other types of government information disseminated to the public.
c. Within 120 days, the Deputy Director for Management at OMB will issue,
through separate guidance or as part of any planned comprehensive management
guidance, a longer-term comprehensive strategy for Federal spending
transparency, including the Federal Funding Accountability Transparency Act and
the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act. This guidance will identify the
method for agencies to report quarterly on their progress toward improving their
information quality.
3. Create and Institutionalize a Culture of Open Government
To create an unprecedented and sustained level of openness and accountability in every
agency, senior leaders should strive to incorporate the values of transparency,
participation, and collaboration into the ongoing work of their agency. Achieving a more
open government will require the various professional disciplines within the Government
– such as policy, legal, procurement, finance, and technology operations – to work
together to define and to develop open government solutions. Integration of various
disciplines facilitates organization-wide and lasting change in the way that Government
works.
a. Within 120 days, each agency shall develop and publish on its Open Government
Webpage an Open Government Plan that will describe how it will improve
transparency and integrate public participation and collaboration into its activities.
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The implementing guidance for the Federal Managers’ Financial Integrity Act can be found in OMB Circular A-
123, “Management’s Responsibility for Internal Control.

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Additional details on the required content of this plan are attached. Each agency’s
plan shall be updated every two years.
b. Within 60 days, the Federal Chief Information Officer and the Federal Chief
Technology Officer shall create an Open Government Dashboard on
www.whitehouse.gov/open. The Open Government Dashboard will make
available each agency’s Open Government Plan, together with aggregate statistics
and visualizations designed to provide an assessment of the state of open
government in the Executive Branch and progress over time toward meeting the
deadlines for action outlined in this Directive.
c. Within 45 days, the Deputy Director for Management at OMB, the Federal Chief
Information Officer, and the Federal Chief Technology Officer will establish a
working group that focuses on transparency, accountability, participation, and
collaboration within the Federal Government. This group, with senior level
representation from program and management offices throughout the
Government, will serve several critical functions, including:
i. Providing a forum to share best practices on innovative ideas to promote
transparency, including system and process solutions for information
collection, aggregation, validation, and dissemination;
ii. Coordinating efforts to implement existing mandates for Federal spending
transparency, including the Federal Funding Accountability Transparency
Act and the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act; and
iii. Providing a forum to share best practices on innovative ideas to promote
participation and collaboration, including how to experiment with new
technologies, take advantage of the expertise and insight of people both
inside and outside the Federal Government, and form high-impact
collaborations with researchers, the private sector, and civil society.
d. Within 90 days, the Deputy Director for Management at OMB will issue, through
separate guidance or as part of any planned comprehensive management
guidance, a framework for how agencies can use challenges, prizes, and other
incentive-backed strategies to find innovative or cost-effective solutions to
improving open government.
4. Create an Enabling Policy Framework for Open Government
Emerging technologies open new forms of communication between a government and the
people. It is important that policies evolve to realize the potential of technology for open
government.

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a. Within 120 days, the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory
Affairs (OIRA), in consultation with the Federal Chief Information Officer and
the Federal Chief Technology Officer, will review existing OMB policies, such as
Paperwork Reduction Act guidance and privacy guidance, to identify
impediments to open government and to the use of new technologies and, where
necessary, issue clarifying guidance and/or propose revisions to such policies, to
promote greater openness in government.
Nothing in this Directive shall be construed to supersede existing requirements for review
and clearance of pre-decisional information by the Director of the Office of Management and
Budget relating to legislative, budgetary, administrative, and regulatory materials. Moreover,
nothing in this Directive shall be construed to suggest that the presumption of openness
precludes the legitimate protection of information whose release would threaten national
security, invade personal privacy, breach confidentiality, or damage other genuinely compelling
interests.
If you have any questions regarding this memorandum, please direct them to
opengov@omb.eop.gov or call Nicholas Fraser, Information Policy Branch, Office of
Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget at (202) 395-3785.

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Attachment
Open Government Plan
1. Formulating the Plan: Your agency’s Open Government Plan is the public roadmap
that details how your agency will incorporate the principles of the President’s January
21, 2009, Memorandum on Transparency and Open Government into the core
mission objectives of your agency. The Plan should reflect the input of (a) senior
policy, legal, and technology leadership in your agency and (b) the general public and
open government experts. It should detail the specific actions that your agency will
undertake and the timeline on which it will do so.
2. Publishing the Plan: Consistent with the deadlines set forth in this Directive, the
Plan should be published online on the agency’s Open Government Webpage in an
open format that enables the public to download, analyze, and visualize any
information and data in the Plan.
3. Components of the Plan:
a. Transparency: Your agency’s Open Government Plan should explain in
detail how your agency will improve transparency. It should describe steps
the agency will take to conduct its work more openly and publish its
information online, including any proposed changes to internal management
and administrative policies to improve transparency. Specifically, as part of
your Plan to enhance information dissemination, your agency should describe
how it is currently meeting its legal information dissemination obligations,
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i. A strategic action plan for transparency that (1) inventories agency
high-value information currently available for download; (2) fosters
the public’s use of this information to increase public knowledge and
promote public scrutiny of agency services; and (3) identifies high
value information not yet available and establishes a reasonable
timeline for publication online in open formats with specific target
dates. High-value information is information that can be used to
increase agency accountability and responsiveness; improve public
knowledge of the agency and its operations; further the core mission of
and how it plans to improve its existing information dissemination practices
by providing:
6
Paperwork Reduction Act, Pub L. No. 104-13, section 3506(d).

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the agency; create economic opportunity; or respond to need and
demand as identified through public consultation.
ii. In cases where the agency provides public information maintained in
electronic format, a plan for timely publication of the underlying data.
This underlying data should be in an open format and as granular as
possible, consistent with statutory responsibilities and subject to valid
privacy, confidentiality, security, or other restrictions. Your agency
should also identify key audiences for its information and their needs,
and endeavor to publish high-value information for each of those
audiences in the most accessible forms and formats. In particular,
information created or commissioned by the Government for
educational use by teachers or students and made available online
should clearly demarcate the public’s right to use, modify, and
distribute the information.
iii. Details as to how your agency is complying with transparency
initiative guidance such as Data.gov, eRulemaking, IT Dashboard,
Recovery.gov, and USAspending.gov. Where gaps exist, the agency
should detail the steps the agency is taking and the timing to meet the
requirements for each initiative.
iv. Details of proposed actions to be taken, with clear milestones, to
inform the public of significant actions and business of your agency,
such as through agency public meetings, briefings, press conferences
on the Internet, and periodic national town hall meetings.
v. A link to a publicly available website that shows how your agency is
meeting its existing records management requirements.
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These
requirements serve as the foundation for your agency’s records
management program, which includes such activities as identifying
and scheduling all electronic records,
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vi. A link to a website that includes (1) a description of your staffing,
organizational structure, and process for analyzing and responding to
FOIA requests; (2) an assessment of your agency’s capacity to
analyze, coordinate, and respond to such requests in a timely manner,
and ensuring the timely transfer
of all permanently valuable records to the National Archives.
7
36 CFR Subchapter B – Records Management.
8
E-Government Act of 2002, Pub L. No. 107-347, section 207(e).

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together with proposed changes, technological resources, or reforms
that your agency determines are needed to strengthen your response
processes; and (3) if your agency has a significant backlog, milestones
that detail how your agency will reduce its pending backlog of
outstanding FOIA requests by at least ten percent each year.
Providing prompt responses to FOIA requests keeps the public
apprised of specific informational matters they seek.
vii. A description or link to a webpage that describes your staffing,
organizational structure, and process for analyzing and responding to
Congressional requests for information.
viii. A link to a publicly available webpage where the public can learn
about your agency’s declassification programs, learn how to access
declassified materials, and provide input about what types of
information should be prioritized for declassification, as appropriate.
Declassification of government information that no longer needs
protection, in accordance with established procedures, is essential to
the free flow of information.
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b. Participation: To create more informed and effective policies, the Federal
Government should promote opportunities for the public to participate
throughout the decision-making process. Your agency’s Open Government
Plan should explain in detail how your agency will improve participation,
including steps your agency will take to revise its current practices to increase
opportunities for public participation in and feedback on the agency’s core
mission activities. The specific details should include proposed changes to
internal management and administrative policies to improve participation.
i. The Plan should include descriptions of and links to appropriate
websites where the public can engage in existing participatory
processes of your agency.
ii. The Plan should include proposals for new feedback mechanisms,
including innovative tools and practices that create new and easier
methods for public engagement.
c. Collaboration: Your agency’s Open Government Plan should explain in
detail how your agency will improve collaboration, including steps the agency
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Executive Order 12958, Classified National Security Information.

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will take to revise its current practices to further cooperation with other
Federal and non-Federal governmental agencies, the public, and non-profit
and private entities in fulfilling the agency’s core mission activities. The
specific details should include proposed changes to internal management and
administrative policies to improve collaboration.
i. The Plan should include proposals to use technology platforms to
improve collaboration among people within and outside your agency.
ii. The Plan should include descriptions of and links to appropriate
websites where the public can learn about existing collaboration
efforts of your agency.
iii. The Plan should include innovative methods, such as prizes and
competitions, to obtain ideas from and to increase collaboration with
those in the private sector, non-profit, and academic communities.
d. Flagship Initiative: Each agency’s Open Government Plan should describe
at least one specific, new transparency, participation, or collaboration
initiative that your agency is currently implementing (or that will be
implemented before the next update of the Open Government Plan). That
description should include:
i. An overview of the initiative, how it addresses one or more of the
three openness principles, and how it aims to improve agency
operations;
ii. An explanation of how your agency engages or plans to engage the
public and maintain dialogue with interested parties who could
contribute innovative ideas to the initiative;
iii. If appropriate, identification of any partners external to your agency
with whom you directly collaborate on the initiative;
iv. An account of how your agency plans to measure improved
transparency, participation, and/or collaboration through this initiative;
and
v. An explanation of the steps your agency is taking to make the initiative
sustainable and allow for continued improvement.
e. Public and Agency Involvement: Your agency’s Open Government Plan
should include, but not be limited to, the requirements set forth in this

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attachment. Extensive public and employee engagement should take place
during the formation of this plan, which should lead to the incorporation of
relevant and useful ideas developed in that dialogue. Public engagement
should continue to be part of your agency’s periodic review and modification
of its plan. Your agency should respond to public feedback on a regular basis.